23rd March – If you know your history

120 years ago …on this day ( Sunday) Celts have returned home happy from Love Street in Paisley, having secured yet another place in a Scottish Cup Final. Our 8th Final in 14 years!!

This will be our 4th Final in a Row.

The first ever ‘All Green’ Final awaits…

Had to, just had to ….

1902-03-22: St Mirren 2-3 Celtic, Scottish Cup Semi-Final

Scottish Cup semi-final

(ht 1-2)

Only major competition match in the whole month.

Celtic objected to the similarity in the team colours – St Mirren wore black and white vertical, and Celtic wore green and white vertical.

The home team had to change in those days, and St Mirren changed into a light blue strip.

Hibs beat Rangers on the same day to make the first ever all-green Scottish Cup final.

Teams

Celtic:

McFarlane; Watson and Battles; Loney, Marshall and Orr; Livingstone, McDermott, Campbell, McMahon and Quinn.

Goalscorers: Livingstone 1, Campbell 15, McDermott 49

St Mirren

Stark, Jackson and Cameron; Greenlees, Bruce and McAvoy; Lindsay, Hamilton, Moffat, Fraser and Robertson

Goals: Moffat 30, 55

Referee: Mr Simpson, Aberdeen

Attendance: 12,000

Need verification this is the same Robertson ?? Listed as Outside Left.

50 years ago …. on this day (Thursday) Celts are looking forward to the draw for next round of European Cup -which just happens to be yet another Semi-Final

1972-03-22: Celtic 1-1 Ujpest Dosza, European Cup Q.F. (2nd leg)

The match was 75,000 sell out with thousands unable to get tickets.

George Connelly was back fit again and after playing in the Friendly against Clydebank Jimmy Johnstone was declared fit too. Also, Back in came Kenny Dalglish who had been rested in the Cup game against Hearts.

The Hungarians arrived on the Monday and trained at Celtic Park. They were fitter than they had been for the first game in Hungary and were confident on pulling back the deficit.

Celtic win 3-2 on aggregate.

Johnstone’s appearance as sub is the turning point of the match

Who doesn’t have this programme? …. 😊

Review

Stein fielded five of his younger stars and was rewarded by Macari’s magnificent opportunist lob over the Ujpest keeper.
Ujpest came at Celtic from the start and scored in 5 minutes. In the first half they were a constant threat as Celtic fought to hold them at bay. The normally unflappable Connelly looked ill at ease at the back.
After half time Celtic found their feet and only a magnificent save from the Ujpest keeper prevented Murdoch scoring from an excellent free kick.
Johnstone’s appearance brought the biggest roar of the night on the hour when he replaced Brogan. Macari’s goal came shortly after when a glorious long pass from Connelly sent him clear on goal. Macari deserved the goal as he had ran his heart out and worked tirelessly up front.
Ujpest pressed until the final minute and it was a nervous night for Jock Stein, the Celtic players and their fans.

Teams

Celtic: Williams, McGrain, Brogan ( Johnstone 54), Murdoch, McNeill, Connelly, Hood, Hay, Dalglish, Macari, Lennox -Subs: Connaghan, Callaghan, Davidson, Deans.
Goal: Macari (64)

Ujpest Dosza:
Szenthihalvi, Kaposzia, Maurer, Johasz, C. Dunai, Horvath, Fazekas, Bene, A. Dunai, Zambo, Toth.
Goal: A Dunai (5)

Referee: R. Schaut (Belgium)
Attendance: 75,000

The Scotsman, Thursday 9th March 1972 (note: this was 23rd March edition)

Macari gives Ujpest the Runaround

By John Rafferty

CELTIC 1, UJPEST DOZSA 1 (agg: 3-2)

In the end, Celtic swept majestically into the semi-final of the European Champions Cup for the third time in six years, but they had to survive a troubled first half in which they could develop no rhythm at all. Eventually, they did find the beat, and all was well in the end; and latterly, this Ujpest Dozsa, a competent and well-ordered team, were rushed and tormented to destruction by dashing Celtic football.

In that first half, Celtic lost a goal in the fifth minute; but before the game started, an unusually jittery Connelly seemed to have lost his touch on the ball and it took him a long time to settle. Only then was there a steady Celtic defence against the machinations of that great chancemaker Bene, and the three racing forwards he provided for.

Perhaps, however, the turn­ing-point in the game was an injury to Brogan in the fifty-fifth minute. He had to go off and was substituted, to tremendous enthusiasm, by Jimmy Johnstone. The import­ance of the move, however, was that Celtic’s midfield section was rearranged.

Hay moved to left back, and Dalglish dropped back to the midfield, and immediately the play was better co-ordinated. Lennox produced great running on the left; Johnstone jinked typically on the right; and Macari caused endless trouble to these sturdy Hungarian defenders and eventually he scored the goal than ended the contest.

Celtic’s sensible intention to consolidate at the start was shattered in the fifth minute when a jittery defence lost a goal. Connelly in these opening minutes had no touch at all on the ball and when Murdoch lost it 40 yards out neither he nor McNeill could get to it and that great chance maker Bene was quickly on to it and opening the goal with a superb cross. Ankal Donai scored with a neat shot which save Williams no chance.

A sign of the pressure on them was that the fiery left back Johasz had his name taken and then was sternly warned for another foul on Macari.

Near half-time the Hungarians were defending heroically and desperately but still managing to break into sophisticated attack. The game then was delicately poised.

The Hungarians substituted Grocs for the dangerous left-winger, Toth at half-time, but Murdoch immediately stirred up the action with a typical shot which carried just wide.

There was a tremendous shot by Hood which seemed a certain goal, but somehow the goal­keeper got to it. When the ball was cleared, Brogan was seen to be lying on the ground, nursing a leg injury.

He played on, but in the tenth minute of the half had to go off; and to a wild shriek of anticipa­tion Johnstone came on for him and went to the right wing. Hay moved to left back, with Dalglish dropping back a pace or two to the midfield.

In the 19th minute of the half, Celtic scored the goal which by that time seemed inevitable.

Maurer was going for a ball on the edge of the penalty area when he was harassed by Dalglish. He tried to head the ball back to his goalkeeper, but Macari shrewdly anticipated the move, and ran round him. He beat the goalkeeper to it and cleverly lobbed the ball over his head. It was such a goal as those two were always liable to concoct.

Celtic went after another, and with dashing, exciting football had the Hungarians crushed into subjection. When Johnstone began to find his touch this harassed team were really in trouble.

In other news….

1708 Pretender to the English throne James III attempts to land at Firth of Forth, Scotland, but is turned away by the British Royal Navy

1857 Fannie Farmer, American culinary pioneer who revolutionised modern cooking through the introduction of precise measurements (Boston Cooking-School Cook Book), born in Boston, Massachusetts (d. 1915) fnnaaaarrrrr – apologies folks…

1868 University of California founded in Oakland, California

1878 English FA Cup Final, Kennington Oval, London: Wanderers beat Royal Engineers, 3–1; Wanderers’ back-to-back and 5th title overall

1933 Enabling Act: German Reichstag grants Adolfova Hitler dictatorial powers

1945 The Swallow Sidecar Company headed by William Lyons agrees to change its name to Jaguar

1968 Reprise Records releases “Song To A Seagull”, Canadian singer-songwriter. Joni Mitchell’s debut studio album

2016 GPR investigation of Shakespeare’s tomb at Holy Trinity Church in Stratford concludes the Bard’s skull probably has been stolen… ( alas… poor Yorick…)

Note: The excellent Celtic Wiki site is the font of all knowledge on things Celtic. Most of the Celtic stuff above is from that site. The guys who set it up and painstakingly keep it updated, deserve no end of credit, praise and thanks. A treasure trove for Celtic fans young and old – and new- and free to view.

Respect Bhoys!

http://www.thecelticwiki.com/m/

Guest article by Saltires en Sevilla.

Change the record by sending an article to sentinelcelts@gmail.com

19 Comment authors
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Craig76

Saltires en sevilla
Great read yet again 👏
As for Robertson it seems it is same player
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Robertson_(footballer)

Craig 76

Here is the rest of the football cards that got released ( numbers 1 and 13 never got released for some reason)
Any of the fine folk on here have any of them in their collections of memorabilia

https://cardhawkuk.com/product-tag/footballers-series-1-cup-tie/

Jobo Baldie

Good morning, friends and thanks as always SES for this week’s history recap.

Saltires en Sevilla

Craig 67

Cheers buddy- I’ve been trying to find out where Robert Robertson was born
Suspect he is Paisley

got a few of those Celtic cards btw

Good morning Jobo and cheers

Leggy

Morning all,

Another very fine history lesson there, SeS

Cheers 👍

This international break is a right pain in the …

Roll on 3rd April and the Glasgow Derby.

HH 🍀🍀

Craig76

.

Craig76

Full Interview | Ange Postecoglou: defying the critics and making his mark / Optus Sport

GER57

Craig67
Cheers for putting up that Jinky clip last night. Yes my fav goal was there. The wee man scored some spectacular goals. I was lucky enough to see quite a few of them. For me, the best bits are when he leaves the full backs disco dancin’ then falling over. They must have been demented, chasing a blur all over the park

GER57

Sorry, Craig 76

Saltires en Sevilla

Leggy

Cheers buddy …agree these breaks are far too often – hoping all back with no mishaps 😅

Bigrailroadblues

Good afternoon all from Shawlands. Beer on the menu. It’s a hard life and I do suffer for my art.

The Gombeen Man

SES,

Thanks for the article.

Here’s the first part of that reply I tried to post a couple of weeks ago…

“Good luck with trying to decipher that period.

There were essentially 5 groups.

The Gaelic, Old English, New English, The English and Religion : Quite a mix.

Add to that influences from the Norse Tradition. Names like McAuliff, son of Olaf, McBirney, son of Bjorn.

All vying for their own individual self-interest and power. All with an agenda, an ideology and a belief system. Sometimes using force, sometimes deception, occasionally submitting, buying time then reneging.

What must be stressed is that this was an ongoing battle for survival against a foreign power; England. Further complicated by religious conflict.

Not merely religious conflict in terms of Catholics and the Reformed faiths but conflict between Celtic Christianity and Roman Catholicism.

Celtic Christianity not only had different interpretations of practice but also embraced some of the traditions of the Celtic (pagan) era.

Sometimes we can get lost in the detail of who did or said what. The simple reality is that this was an unrelenting campaign of English colonial brutality.

It really isn’t an examination of the pros and cons of the Gael or his religious integrity. It’s really about the abuses of a neighbouring nation.

Contrary to popular belief, The Gael had a reasonably sophisticated system of governance. The Brehon Laws. They had provision for divorce and a criminal code based on a system of compensation.

Capital punishment really came to the fore in Ireland with the English Common Law and the emerg

England had ‘benefitted’ from the Celts, Romans, Saxons, Vikings and the Norman. Celtic Ireland, was labeled a backward, barbarian, savage place, even by Rome.

Ireland’s rich monastic heritage as a seat of learning for Europe’s elite had been battered by two hundred years of conflict and pilage by the Vikings.

The island was ripe for conquer and plunder.

This false image of the barbarian Irish sub-class is still deeply conditioned into the British psyche – and of other immigrant groups.

https://www.irishlegal.com/articles/irish-legal-heritage-eraic-reparation-in-brehon-law

Anyway,

Just about every Irish myth, story or legend I’ve come across sees our hero visit Scotland at one point or another.

The Gaels were back and forth between Ireland and Scotland for generations. They hired Highlanders or Western Islanders as mercenaries to fight against the English and opposing Clans.

These Scotmen were feared and were a vital component in the defence of Ireland.

They were known as Gallowglass, in English.

Gall = Foreign
Óglaigh = Warrior/Soldier.

Gallóglaigh.

Not enough is made of the contribution of Scots to the defence of Ireland.

A problem of the Gaelic system was the system of Tanistry. This related to succession and meant that a Clan leader was elected from members of an elite group.

The second in command was the Tánaiste but that didn’t mean automatic succession. It was democratic process which led to feuding.

The title of Tánaiste survives in the Irish Government to this day.

The absence of Primogeniture led to seemingly never-ending infighting, which the English  ruthlessly exploited.

It meant a lack of certainty about who controlled what and this lack of clarity was exacerbated by the incursions of the Tudors.

Surrender and Re-grant of lands by Gaelic Lords was always unlikely to work. It introduced primogeniture but caused conflict within Gaelic Clans. It also caused inter-Clan conflicts.

Hugh O’Neill, Earl of Tyrone (The Flight of The Earls) is a good example.

Hugh’s father, Philip (allegedly) was the product of an affair between, Phillip’s father, Conn O’Neill and a married woman called Alison Kelly.

Nothing was known by the O’Neill Clan of Phillips’ existence until he appeared on the scene at age, 14-16.

He was welcomed into the Clan by his father, Conn and took up a prime position.

When Conn submitted to the Crown via Surrender and Re-grant, Phillip became Heir Designate.

This meant Philip’s son, Hugh and his children were in line to inherit Tyrone. The other brothers would lose the right to be elected Chieftain/Earl.

A huge move away from the established practice.

Predictably this didn’t go down well. Phillip was later murdered by a family member and so began a cycle of bitter infighting.

Hugh O’Neill was then raised by wealthy English settlers, probably in the Pale and became comfortable with the the English code of conduct. Hugh was even introduced at Court in London.

He also fought for the English. In many ways he was groomed to be sympathetic to England.

It didn’t work out that way.

Spend a little time and look at his life, that’ll paint a picture. Look at how he was able to interact with the English and the tensions with other Gaelic Lords.

This cycle of infighting is replicated throughout the Gaelic system. English generals and politicians would set them up against each other…

England had left these customs behind, she was in a position to exploit the discipline that Rome and the Normans had brought.

She had left the ‘pagan practices’ of the Celt behind.

The modern relative sophistication of the English hierarchical system outstripped the sometimes chaotic Gaelic structure.

Arguably this was further enhanced by England’s break from the confusion and politics of Rome.

Mahe

SES, as usual we are in your debt.

I enjoyed that read. I’d never heard of that Hungarian team tbh, there’s a nation that should be having a much bigger impact on the sport and maybe the globe.
Interesting Jocks decision to play five kids was seen as the masterstroke, it’s almost as if he cottoned on they were fearless and imaginative on the ball eh? I guess Williams kept between the sticks warm in between Simpson and Bonnar.
It’s also notable how unbiased the old match reports were, almost as if the writers respected the game and ourselves back then. Today’s fans with typewriters aren’t a patch on some of those scribblers.
Shakespeares skull gone? I know a few guys whose heads have gone but didn’t know the famous bard was among that list.
Cheers again, enjoyed that read.

It’s in the twenties here in California already. A long hot summer awaits, just hope there’s not much fires so fresh air accompanies the heat.

Happy day of Woden y’all, aka hump day.

Hail Hail

The Gombeen Man

SES,

If you’re still awake Part II,

….At the beginning of the 17th Century England attempted to remove the system of Tanistry…

‘the true cause of the barbarism and desolation which was in all the Irish counties’, and that it was ‘void against the king, as being prejudicial to his profit and prerogative’.

https://www.irishlegal.com/articles/irish-legal-heritage-the-case-of-tanistry

The removal of the Gaelic Lords made way for the Plantation of the North but paradoxically also undermined the English.

They had lost a powerful potential ally and had little leverage with the Gaelic population. Maybe that’s why they went to such great lengths to keep some semblance of co-operation with favoured sections of the Gaelic hierarchy?

England perceived Ireland as an opportunity and a threat. What would the population be here if there hadn’t been a systematic destabilisation of the population and economy over a number of centuries?

The 9 Years War cost England £2m. The cost of the war undermined the position of the Monarchy. The Irish weren’t the only folk who resisted the growing power of the King/Queen.

The English public were in acute state of anxiety about Ireland. The island had to be controlled. Ireland was the Ukraine or Afghanistan of it’s day.
Even England’s finest, Shakespeare couldn’t resist writing about the threat of Ireland…

‘The uncivil Kernes of Ireland are in arms. And temper clay with blood of Englishmen.’

Henry VI.

Kernes were the English name for Irish warriors, who had been displaced from their land and became full-time soldiers, marauding across the country.

Our descendants were today’s Ukrainian or Afghan refugees.

These factors led to the Scorched Earth policy, Plantations, Cromwell, Transportation, Penal Laws, Depopulation, Demonisation…

The dominance of England over her neighbour was parasitic. Over the centuries, Ireland was stripped of her resources; her people, her lands, forestry and agriculture.

A systematic erosion of Gaelic land, nobility, people, resources, culture and religion.

This was accompanied by the suffocation of the economy. Eventually when the War of Independence came there was better cohesion.

No conflict between Chieftains, different military tactics. Education had produced a more even playing field. The impact of the displaced diaspora overseas.

Invented notions of English superiority were exposed as groundless.

…Until disagreement resulted in the Civil War.

A familiar story with the end of British Colonial oppression, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Middle East.

England left behind a ravaged, Third World economy. Dark days followed as Ireland struggled to build a modern democracy, free from the exploitation of foreign political and religious interference.

Religion?

Did it prove to be a unifying force among the Gaels? Did it hold the whole fabric of Irish society together during the darkest days?

With the denial of education during the Penal/Land Laws period, it was often the Priest who mediated with Baliffs on the behalf of the oppressed.

There was no hope of the indigenous Irish acknowledging an invading English Monarch as the Head of “God’s Holy Church.”

Unfortunately, the Church and it’s leaders were often embroiled in controversy. More difficulty for Roman Catholicism came after An Gorta Mór, as the Church became more powerful.

It was at it’s best when it was relatively powerless and lived the Gospel.

Ireland has developed considerably from the dark days of sectarian conflict. Internationally she has developed a reputation for generosity, in terms of International Aid (€1bn last year) military personnel to the UN and leadership roles in European and the UN.

Problems remain but the progress across main fronts in a century is encouraging.

It’s probably simplest to take one family from each group and do a mini case study.

For Example,

1) O’Neill or O’Donnell.

2) Plunkett or FitzGerald.

3) Lord Mountcharles, Lord Lucan or the Earl of Essex.

Here’s a starter…

The FitzGerarld’s, Anglo Normans, Carton House…Note how they got some of their lands back after Silken Thomas FitzGeralds’ rebellion.

https://www.cartonhouse.com/history.html

Note the Castle, Carrickmacross, a Plantation Town…Earl of Essex. The 2nd Earl was executed by QEI. Note how the Estate returned to the family.

https://carrickmacross.ie/history/#:~:text=In%201634%20the%20town%20of,%2C%20no%20windows%2C%20no%20chimneys.

Lord Lucan’s Mayo Bolthole. Note his ancestor  nicknamed, ‘The Exterminator’ by the locals.

Still getting Ground Rent??

https://m.independent.ie/life/irish-tenants-still-pay-up-for-vanished-peer-lord-lucan-30779235.html

Slane : Rock Concerts a Royal Affair and The Ascendancy.

From Tamhnach an tSalainn, Tyrconnel (Donegal) to The Royal County of Meath.

https://irishhistorichouses.com/tag/mount-charles-lord/

Till (Much) Later.

The Gombeen Man

SES,

Part II, If you’re still awake.

I’ve a few links and a couple of paragraphs, I’ll try and post later…

…At the beginning of the 17th Century England attempted to remove the system of Tanistry…

‘the true cause of the barbarism and desolation which was in all the Irish counties’, and that it was ‘void against the king, as being prejudicial to his profit and prerogative’.

https://www.irishlegal.com/articles/irish-legal-heritage-the-case-of-tanistry

The removal of the Gaelic Lords made way for the Plantation of the North but paradoxically also undermined the English.

They had lost a powerful potential ally and had little leverage with the Gaelic population. Maybe that’s why they went to such great lengths to keep some semblance of co-operation with favoured sections of the Gaelic hierarchy?

England perceived Ireland as an opportunity and a threat. What would the population be here if there hadn’t been a systematic destabilisation of the population and economy over a number of centuries?

The 9 Years War cost England £2m. The cost of the war undermined the position of the Monarchy. The Irish weren’t the only folk who resisted the growing power of the King/Queen.

The English public were in acute state of anxiety about Ireland. The island had to be controlled. Ireland was the Ukraine or Afghanistan of it’s day.
Even England’s finest, Shakespeare couldn’t resist writing about the threat of Ireland…

‘The uncivil Kernes of Ireland are in arms. And temper clay with blood of Englishmen.’

Henry VI.

Kernes were the English name for Irish warriors, who had been displaced from their land and became full-time soldiers, marauding across the country.

Our descendants were today’s Ukrainian or Afghan refugees.

These factors led to the Scorched Earth policy, Plantations, Cromwell, Transportation, Penal Laws, Depopulation, Demonisation…

The dominance of England over her neighbour was parasitic. Over the centuries, Ireland was stripped of her resources; her people, her lands, forestry and agriculture.

A systematic erosion of Gaelic land, nobility, people, resources, culture and religion.

This was accompanied by the suffocation of the economy. Eventually when the War of Independence came there was better cohesion.

No conflict between Chieftains, different military tactics (some learned from England). Education had produced a more even playing field. The impact also of the displaced diaspora overseas.

Invented notions of English superiority were exposed as groundless.

…Until disagreement resulted in the Civil War.

A familiar story with the end of British Colonial oppression, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Middle East.

England left behind a ravaged, Third World economy.

Dark days followed as Ireland struggled to build a modern democracy, free from the exploitation of foreign political and religious interference.

The Gombeen Man

Religion?

Did it prove to be a unifying force among the Gaels? Did it hold the whole fabric of Irish society together during the darkest days?

With the denial of education during the Penal/Land Laws period, it was often the Priest who mediated with Baliffs on the behalf of the oppressed.

There was no hope of the indigenous Irish acknowledging an invading English Monarch as the Head of “God’s Holy Church.”

Unfortunately, the Church and it’s leaders were often embroiled in controversy. More difficulty for Roman Catholicism came after An Gorta Mór, as the Church became more powerful.

It was at it’s best when it was relatively powerless and lived the Gospel.

Ireland has developed considerably from the dark days of sectarian conflict. Internationally she has developed a reputation for generosity. In terms of International Aid, miliary personnel to the UN and senior leadership roles at European and a Global level.

https://www.irishaid.ie/news-publications/press/pressreleasearchive/2021/#:~:text=Minister%20for%20Foreign%20Affairs%2C%20Simon%20Coveney%2C%20TD%2C%20today%20pledged,response%20to%20a%20single%20crisis.

Numerous problems remain but the progress over one century is encouraging.

It’s probably simplest to take one family from each group and do a mini case study.

For Example,

1) O’Neill or O’Donnell.

2) Plunkett or FitzGerald.

3) Lord Mountcharles, Lord Lucan or the Earl of Essex.

Here’s a starter…

The FitzGerarld’s, Anglo Normans, Carton House…Note how they got some of their lands back after Silken Thomas FitzGeralds’ rebellion.

https://www.cartonhouse.com/history.html

Note the Castle, Carrickmacross, a Plantation Town…Earl of Essex. The 2nd Earl was executed by QEI. Note how the Estate returned to the family.

https://carrickmacross.ie/history/#:~:text=In%201634%20the%20town%20of,%2C%20no%20windows%2C%20no%20chimneys.

Lord Lucan’s Mayo Bolthole. Note his ancestor  nicknamed, ‘The Exterminator’ by the locals.

Still getting Ground Rent??

https://m.independent.ie/life/irish-tenants-still-pay-up-for-vanished-peer-lord-lucan-30779235.html

Slane : Rock Concerts a Royal Affair and The Ascendancy.

From Tamhnach an tSalainn, Tyrconnel (Donegal) to The Royal County of Meath.

https://irishhistorichouses.com/tag/mount-charles-lord/

Weet weet weet

Primary school football
The Rules Of The Game
General
Matches shall be played over three unequal periods: two playtimes and lunchtime. Each of these periods shall begin shortly after the ringing of a bell, and although a bell is also rung towards the end of these periods, play may continue for up to ten minutes afterwards, depending on the nihilism or “bottle” of the participants with regard to corporal punishment meted out to latecomers back to the classroom. In practice there is a sliding scale of nihilism, from those who hasten to stand in line as soon as the bell rings, known as “poofs”, through those who will hang on until the time they estimate it takes the teachers to down the last of their G&T’s and journey from the staff room, known as “chancers”, and finally to those who will hang on until a teacher actually has to physically retrieve them, known as “nutters”.
This sliding scale is intended to radically alter the logistics of a match in progress, often having dramatic effects on the scoreline as the number of remaining participants drops. It is important, therefore, in picking the sides, to achieve a fair balance of poofs, chancers and nutters in order that the scoreline achieved over a sustained period of play – lunchtime, for instance – is not totally nullified by a five-minute post-bell onslaught of five nutters against one. The scoreline to be carried over from the previous period of the match is in the trust of the last nutters to leave the field of play, and may be the matter of some debate. This must be resolved in one of the approved manners (see adjudication).
Parameters
The object is to force the ball between two large, unkempt piles of jackets, in lieu of goalposts. These piles may grow or shrink throughout the match, depending on the number of participants and the prevailing weather. as the number of players increases, so shall the piles. Each jacket added to the pile by a new addition to a side should be placed on the inside, nearest the goalkeeper, thus reducing the target area. It is also important that the sleeve of one of the jackets should jut out across the goalmouth, as it will often be claimed that the ball went “over the post” and it can henceforth be asserted that the outstretched sleeve denotes the innermost part of the pile and thus the inside of the post. The on-going reduction of the size of the goal is the responsibility of any respectable defence and should be undertaken conscientiously with resourcefulness and imagination. In the absence of a crossbar, the upper limit of the target area is observed as being slightly above head height, although when the height at which a ball passed between the jackets is in dispute, judgement shall liewith an arbitrary adjudicator from one of the sides. He is known as the best fighter”; his decision is final and may be enforced with physical violence if anyone wants to stretch a point. In games on large open spaces, the length of the pitch is obviously denoted by the jacket piles, but the width is a variable. In the absence of roads, water hazards etc, the width is determined by how far out the attacking winger has to meander before the pursuing defender gets fed up and lets him head back towards where the rest of the players are waiting, often as far as quarter of a mile away. It is often observed that the playing area is “not a full-size pitch”. This can be invoked verbally to justify placing a wall of players eighteen inches from the ball at direct free kicks. It is the formal response to “yards”, which the kick-taker will incant meaninglessly as he places the ball. Tactics Playground football tactics are best explained in terms of team formation. Whereas senior sides tend to choose – according to circumstance – from among a number of standard options (eg 4-4-2, 4-3-3, 5-3-2), the playground side is usually more rigid in sticking to the all-purpose 1-1-17 formation.
This formation is a sturdy basis for the unique style of play, ball-flow and territorial give-and-take that makes the playground game such a renowned and strategically engrossing spectacle. Just as the 5-3-2 formation is sometimes referred to in practice as “Catenaccio”, the 1-1-17 formation gives rise to a style of play that is best described as “Nomadic”. all but perhaps four of the participants (see also Offside) migrate en masse from one area of the pitch to another, following the ball, and it tactically vital that every last one of them remains within a ten-yard radius of it at all times.
Stoppages
Much stoppage time in the senior game is down to injured players requiring treatment on the field of play. The playground game flows freer having adopted the refereeing philosophy of “no post-mortem, no free-kick”, and play will continue around and even on top of a participant who has fallen in the course of his endeavours. However, the playground game is nonetheless subject to other interruptions, and some examples are listed below.
1. Ball on school roof or over school wall.
The retrieval time itself is negligible in these cases. The stoppage is most prolonged by the argument to decide which player must risk life, limb or four of the belt to scale the drainpipe or negotiate the barbed wire in order to return the ball to play. Disputes usually arise between the player who actually struck the ball and any others he claims it may have struck before disappearing into forbidden territory. In the case of the Best Fighter having been adjudged responsible for such an incident, a volunteer is often required to go in his stead or the game may be abandoned, as the Best Fighter is entitled to observe that (a) “you can’t make me”; or (b) “It’s not my ball anyway”.
2. Bigger boys steal ball.
A highly irritating interruption, the length of which is determined by the players’ experience in dealing with this sort of thing. The intruders will seldom actually steal the ball, but will improvise their own kickabout amongst themselves, occasionally inviting the younger players to attempt to tackle them. Standing around looking bored and unimpressed usually results in a quick restart. Shows of frustration and engaging in attempts to win back the ball can prolong the stoppage indefinitely. Informing the intruders that one of the players’ older brother is “Mad Paul Murphy” or some other noted local pugilist can also ensure minimum delay.
3. Menopausal old bag confiscates ball.
More of a threat in the street or local green kickabout than within the school walls. Sad, blue-rinsed, ill-tempered, Tory-voting cat-owner transfers her anger about the array of failures that has been her life to nine-year-olds who have committed the heinous crime of letting their ball cross her privet Line of Death. Interruption (loss of ball) is predicted to last “until you learn how to play with it properly”, but instruction on how to achieve this without actually having the bloody thing is not usually forwarded. Tact is required in these circumstances, even when the return of the ball seems highly unlikely, as further irritation of woman may result in the more serious stoppage: Menopausal old bag calls police. Celebration Goal-scorers are entitled to a maximum run of thirty yards with their hands in the air, making crowd noises and saluting imaginary packed terraces. Congratulation by team-mates is in the measure appropriate to the importance of the goal in view of the current scoreline (for instance, making it 34-12 does not entitle the player to drop to his knees and make the sign of the cross), and the extent of the scorer’s contribution. A fabulous solo dismantling of the defence or 25-yard (actually eight yards, but calculated as relative distance because “it’s not a full-size pitch”) rocket shot will elicit applause and back-pats from the entire team and the more magnanimous of the opponents.
However, a tap-in in the midst of a chaotic scramble will be heralded withthe epithet “poaching bas*ard” from the opposing defence amidst mild acknowledgment from team-mates. Applying an unnecessary final touch when a ball is already rolling into the goal will elicit a burst nose from the original striker.
Kneeling down to head the ball over the line when defence and keeper are already beaten will elicit a thoroughly deserved kicking.
As a footnote, however, it should be stressed that any goal scored by the Best Fighter will be met with universal acclaim, even if it falls into any of the latter three categories.
Penalties
At senior level, each side often has one appointed penalty-taker, who will defer to a team-mate in special circumstances, such as his requiring one more for a hat trick. The playground side has two appointed penalty-takers: the Best Player and the Best Fighter.
The arrangement is simple: the Best Player takes the penalties when his side is a retrievable margin behind, and the Best Fighter at all other times. If the side is comfortably in front, the ball-owner may be invited to take a penalty. Goalkeepers are often the subject of temporary substitutions at penalties, forced to give up their position to the Best Player or Best Fighter, who recognise the kudos attached to the heroic act of saving one of these kicks, and are buggered if “little Billy” is going to steal any ofit.
Close Season
This is known also as the Summer Holidays, which the players usually spend dabbling briefly in other sports: tennis for a fortnight while Wimbledon is on the telly; pitch-and-putt for four days during the Open; and cricket for about an hour and a half until they discover that it really is as boring to play as it is to watch.

big packy

AFTERNOON ALL and JIM, saltires a magnificent read as always👍the gombeen man, same to you👍 listen ghuys dont tell jim or sol kitts but your great posts are even better than my true stories, another true story🤩

The Fenian Whaler

TGM @ 1.22

Yet 2 more excellent posts on Irish history. However, I should point out that most ‘gallowglasses’ in Ireland were in fact Irish-born. Admittedly their ancestors were Norse-Scots mercenaries who had settled in Ireland and in the time-honored fashion, Pre Tudor / Stuart that is, had become more Irish than the Irish. Clans such as McSweeney, MacDonnell, and MacCabe are prime examples of these Norse-Scots-Irish hybrid clans. Latterly the Irish term Gallóglaigh came to mean a type of warrior and fighting style, rather than any ethnic designation.

Saltires

As always it is a real pleasure to read your lead articles. The away leg of European tie was played earlier in March 1972. Ujpesti Dozsa were in fine form at the time, and were considered by many on the Continent, to be favourites to win the tournament. A 1-2 victory by the Celts in Budapest was therefore reckoned to be a fantastic result. The away game made headlines all over Europe due to the world-famous celebrity double act, Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. The journalist Gerry McNee, who was covering the game for the Daily Express, decided to seek out Richard Burton at The Intercontinental Hotel, on the slim chance of receiving an interview with the great man. On locating Burton, McNee explained why he was in Budapest, and mentioned that there were a few Celtic fans over for the match. Despite being a rugby man, the faithfulness of these supporters greatly impressed Mr Burton, and McNee and as many supporters as McNee could round up, were invited to a party that night in the Burton suite at the hotel. Most of the Celtic supporters were staying in the same budget hotel, and most were understandably dubious at the supposed party invite. Many may well have had a wee refreshment or two before and during the game. McNee eventually persuaded the supporters to join him in the Intercontinental Hotel, and they were understandably stunned, when the most famous celebrity couple in the world at that time, walked into the room. A great night was had by all.

I had totally forgotten about these events Saltires, till you referenced the game above. One of the first scholarly Celtic books that I read as a youngster, was:

“And You’ll Never Walk Alone”

by the aforementioned Gerry McNee and published in 1972. The book was a tour de farce of the very earliest adventures of the Celtic support, following the team away from home in Europe. The book starts, from memory, with the Celts winning the league at Fir Park in 1966, and covers both European cup finals, the infamous Racing FC game, and various other games which Celtic played in the European Cup, from a supporters perspective. The front cover of the book is a classic, showing as it does Celtic supporters on the roof of the Fir Park enclosure, at the league winning game in 1966.

Just for the craic, I went on line to see if the book is still available. It is indeed. The cheapest copy of the book is available for £45. That’s in paperback. Some sites are charging north of £150.

TGM

Another stunning and informative post. Keep ’em coming, per favor.

Hail Hail.

big packy

MAGUA you mentioned celtic winning the league at fir park in 1966, was not at the game, but was at the game at east end park in dunfermline in 1968, good god there were hundreds of people on the roof of the stands and on the floodlight pylons, I myself had to climb up onto one of the pylons because i couldnt see a thing,,another true story,👍

Craig76
BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS

SALTIRES

Wow,I’m so looking forward to the conclusion of our cup run. Eight finals in fourteen years is some going.

BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS

MAGUA

Pretty sure that book is up in PADDY’SMAWS loft,along with other Celtic paraphernalia from my youth. Most of them were gifts,so I can’t really take the credit.

ATHINGOFBEAUTY told me a few years ago that she had found a photo up there of The Lisbon Lions-and it was signed on the back by the lot of them! I’d forgotten about that,and I think the signatures are Xeroxed. But still anaw…

big packy

CRAIG76 im famous at last,🤩🤩

BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS

WEETWEETWEET

Always makes me laugh,reading that! And so true too. Hope you are well,J. Need to try and get you out for a beer in June,not seen you for bliddy ages!

Prestonpans bhoys

Bobby

The Lisbon Lions-and it was signed on the back by the lot of them!

I’ve got that too but its a print job not hand written individually

BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS

PRESTONPANSBHOY

Aye,I was pretty sure it was Xeroxed,as I mentioned. Still a joy to behold though.

Leggy

Non football story,

Remember early 1990’s and we were at a work’s conference in Southport.

After it finished, someone mentioned that Southport had the smallest pub in Britain, namely The Lakeside.

Well being a sucker for “all things small” I asked my 2 work colleagues to join me for a visit.( Late 7o’s I had been in a pub called The Drury, next to the Horseshoe in Glasgow, which was absolutely tiny, and It couldn’t be beat on size !!!)

Well we went to Lakeside pub and it was very small, might have been 8 in total, and what do you know, a fight started !!!

Ahh Memories !!!!!

Still believe it’s still there and not grown in size, but The Drury for me, still beat’s it ????

Anyone ever visited either Establishments. ?????

Bawheid

Saltires,

Another top read:Lou Macari, well remember recently when Fergus -Hun the Alloa manager and Insolvency expert suggested to his players to take niggly bites at the Celtic players ankles. Well, Lou was like a wee Fox Terrier great at pressurising opponents, snapping at their heels and trying to put them off. Perhaps that’s why the Hungarian left back got yellow carded.
Some players seem to fit right in and blend into the team seamlessly, while others like Macari and Connolly were always considered their own man, more individualistic. Big Jock thought he was a brilliant player and goal scorer, but always his own man. I would imagine that Jock would make suggestions to a player, but Luigi would never listen to him.
“We got Harry and Lou Macari and Kevin Barry”.
I’m sure that I read that Shankly wanted him at Liverpool but Lou opted for United.
It could be said that Lou’s real calling came much later when he provided shelter for the homeless down in Stoke, how good is that and what does that say about the quality of the man, a wee hint towards, “The Quality Street Gang”.

Dalgleish – Hay – Macari – McGrain – Quinn the eskimo man. 😉
Excellent mate, well done … Again.

Craig76

Leggy
Have not been in either of those pubs but when I lived in Cambridge and occasionally went to Bury St Edmunds there was a pub called the Nutshell which claimed to be the smallest 😀

Prestonpans bhoys

Ah that’s what Xeroxed means, I thought it was a fancy sweary word😂😂😂😂😂😂

Craig 76

Seen this Question on Twitter (normal cyber drink for 1st correct answer,will post answer at 8

A quick midweek quiz.

Ned Doig (1866-1919) was a Scottish goalkeeper who played for various teams north and south of the border, most notably Sunderland. He was also a Scottish internationalist.

What interesting achievement in Celtic FC history does he hold?

Prestonpans bhoys

Craig

Got first Scottish cap at CP

Big Packy

One photo that I remember from the book, was yer man who climbed to the very top of the floodlight pylon, when the team came home on the 26th May. How totally nuts must he have been? The game you mentioned at East End Park was the highest attendance in The Pars’ history. The official attendance belied the real attendance, as quite a few bad Bhoys managed to skip in…I trust you weren’t one of them. 😀

BMCUW

I used to have a fair collection of Celtic books back in the day. Gave most of them away, as it’s only right and proper to spread the word.

Leggy

The smallest pub that I have ever been in, would have to be Billy’s Bar in the beautiful Perthshire town of Callander. Half a dozen folk and the place was rammed. Half a dozen normal sized folk that is. 😀

Bawheid

It has been said on a few occasions, that Jock Stein was wary of players who asked too many questions. Players like Bertie and Big TG who could express their opinions well, were a total mystery to him. This was particularly the case with Cairney. Jock was baffled that Big Jim chose to take his final exams in dentistry…rather than go on the close season tour to the USA in 1966. Jim Craig did not reappear in the team until January 1967…replacing the unfortunate Willie O’Neill. Craig came in at right back. TG was moved to left back. A fortuitous decision as it turned out.

Hail Hail.

Craig76

Prestonpans bhoys
Sorry incorrect, but as it was only you that answered you can get the drink 🤣🍺

The answer is that he was the first goalkeeper to keep a clean sheet at Celtic Park (current site). In October 1892 Sunderland beat Celtic 3-0 and Doig was the ‘keeper. The following month Joe Cullen became the first Celtic goalkeeper to do the same, in a 5-0 win over Hearts

Craig76

Nice one. I would never have got that in a month of Sundays. 😀

Hail Hail.

Prestonpans bhoys

Craig76

Supposed to be a dry night but not to offend I’ll open a can😂🍻

Craig76

MAGUA
If I hadn’t seen the answer I’d never of got it myself
Prestonpans bhoys
Any excuse 😀👍

Craig76

If Big Packy had seen the question he’d of got it as he would of been there that day 🤣

Saltires en Sevilla

TGM

Thanks so much for sharing and explaining a very enjoyable read.

McBurney is Nordic ?? Who would have guessed… maybe you would know if Burney or Burnie name has similar origins ( I just assumed Gaels) would the Civil records and COI established records refer to that surname and variants as Bourne ?? Again I had assumed that was Norman origins but recently saw a record that potentially linked an RC record Burnie with a Tithe record ( same man) written as Bourne

The Bourne supremacy? …:)

Craig76

😀

Hail Hail.

BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS

CRAIG76

I’ve been in the nutshell,early 90s. Just off the town square. Think it’s got a dead cat in it,which reminded me of a certain book.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/101_Uses_for_a_Dead_Cat

Saltires en Sevilla

Magua …. wow the value of those editions is a surprise, sure I’ve had a paperback version somewhere.

Have you read Robert Kelly’s book ‘Celtic’ ?

Craig76

BMCUWP
I never managed to get inside the place as was always with the now ex’s parents and me sneaking off to the pub was a no no

Saltires en Sevilla

Mahe – the quality of writing in press then was so much better – I suppose everyone read at least 1 maybe two papers a day? Huge circulations and lots of titles/ options… it seems clear the press now have abandoned any pretence at being evenhanded or fair… they all go for the blue pound and couldn’t care who knows it.

Can understand Sky – BT and all the tabloids etc

But The Beeb are a damned disgrace on so many levels it’s difficult to know where to begin… we pay for these clowns….lying bassas that they are …

Craig 76

Saltires en Sevilla

Bawheid – thanks and didn’t realise he was so single minded Lou went way up in my estimation with his charity work … loved lou As a player seemed capable of anything

Saltires

Indeed I have. Yet another book in my collection that has gone walkies over the years. I seem to remember that Robert Kelly did not have much time for a certain Sir George Graham. A senior Orangeman and high heid yin in the Masons. In 1952, as then Secretary of the SFA, it was Graham who was the main instigator of The Great Flag Flutter. Fortunately for Celtic, Robert Kelly proved to be a man of high principles and stood firm. Such a pity his nephew, Michael Kelly, was made of less sterner stuff. Fecker.

Hail Hail.